GCC pre-med student wins big by being thankful for the smaller things

It isn’t every day a student gets an award of $40k a year. But at Glendale Community College, it seems to happen nearly every year!

Most recently, Gabriela Irra learned she was one of only 47 recipients of the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation’s Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship. This highly competitive national scholarship will provide Gabriela with up to $40,000 annually for a maximum of three years to complete her bachelor’s degree.

In addition, Cooke Transfer Scholars receive comprehensive educational advising from foundation staff to guide them through the processes of transitioning to a four-year school and preparing for their careers. The foundation provides opportunities for internships, study abroad, and graduate school funding. It’s a pretty fantastic set-up for Gabby.

“When I got the news, I just sat there stunned!” said Irra. “My brain wouldn’t function for a little bit! I’m just thankful for everything I have and have been given.”

Gabby knows first hand how important education is. She lived in Mexico, where her education wasn’t always a priority at the school. “So many days I would be the only kid sitting there and the teachers would never show up. I guess that experience taught me to have perspective! We are so lucky to have education and accessible schools here.”

When she moved to Arizona, she quickly embraced every opportunity to learn – grateful for the opportunities and support of professors, college staff, a car to travel to school and all the students support services GCC offers.

According to the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, nearly 2,500 students applied for the Cooke Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship. The foundation evaluated each submission based on academic ability, persistence, leadership, and service to others. Among other criteria, recipients to have an average GPA of 3.92.  

Gabby plans to pursue a doctorate in neuroscience. Before heading into a specialty though, she wants to spend time in general medicine, volunteering for an organization that sends doctors to countries that need help.

“I had the opportunity to do an internship at NYU last summer and got to work in lab with a leader in memory formation and I was hooked. I started out as a psychology major, but I read The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat by Oliver Sacks, and realized I really wanted to work with degenerative neurological diseases.”

Gabby, also a recipient of the All-USA Arizona Scholarship, knows she wouldn’t even have had these tremendous awards if it weren’t for critical faculty intervention and support at GCC from  Ladonna Lewis (Jack Kent Cooke lead for GCC), Julie Waskow (her scholarship mentor) for guiding her through this process, and her Faculty mentor Sagarika Dash. 

“Gabriela certainly represents the best of our Honors program and we incredibly excited for her accomplishment,” said Aubrei Smith, GCC Honors Program Director. “This type of mentoring [from multiple faculty on campus] is an excellent example of how encouragement from others can make a difference to students.

Sagarika encouraged and mentored Gabby in her pursuit of her studies in biology and her future goal of becoming a doctor. Sagarika was so powerful in her encouragement that she convinced Gabby to apply for a prestigious summer research internship at ASU and also a few others out of state. Gabby was the only community college student selected to participate in the ASU research as well as the following summer at New York University. 

Gabby advises all student to always apply for scholarships – even if you think you won’t get it. “Honestly, I could never see myself like my professors did,” she said. “I didn’t take anything for granted. I took advantage of every opportunity.”

Blog Excerpt: 

Meet Gabriela Irra, winner of the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation's Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship.

Publish Date: 
Thursday, May 3, 2018 - 12:30p.m.
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GCC Celebrates Student Success at 2018 Commencement

Every year, as part of the commencement celebration, we like to take a moment to highlight some of our GCC students who have gone above and beyond. These students come from a range of disciplines and backgrounds, but one thing is true of them all: they have worked incredibly hard to achieve their success.

Lovelyn Mekar

Mother of three and the youngest girl of six siblings, Lovelyn Mekar is no stranger to busy schedules. With the discipline she learned from her parents and high school – as well as the support of her loving husband and children – Lovelyn has found the motivation and confidence to reach for her academic and career goals. She chose to attend courses at GCC because she believes it’s a place which prides itself in having few students per group settings, which allows students for more personal interactions between students and their instructors. During her time at GCC she volunteered regularly, through the school, her community and her employer, a practice she believes is of great importance in our society. Lovelyn will be graduating from GCC with an Associate of Arts degree and will be transferring to a University in her pursuit of an advanced accounting degree.

Anabil Frisby

The daughter of Mexican immigrants, Anabil Frisby is a single mother who is unafraid of taking on challenges. Despite being a full-time student, mother and employee, Anabil works hard every day to make sure those who rely on her have what they need while earning her nursing degree, volunteering for a local animal shelter and collecting school supplies for underprivileged children in Mexico. Earning a spot in GCC’s CEP program in Fall of 2016, Anabil admits that the last several years have been tough but she knows she has set a positive example for her daughter and is excited to continue pursuing her passion. Anabil hopes to obtain a Master’s degree and become a nurse practitioner and travel to other countries and provide aid for those in need.

Manuel Orona

A native of Phoenix, Manuel Orona is the first of his family to both obtain US citizenship and attend college. Upon his graduation from Franklin High School, Manuel came to GCC for the opportunity to play football – about which he is incredibly passionate – and to earn a degree that would allow him to pursue his childhood dream of becoming a firefighter. With excellent instructors who encouraged him to achieve his full potential, Manual is excited to be transferring his degree in Fire Science to the University of Memphis in the Fall, where he will be continuing his education while playing offensive guard for the UofM football team.

Congratulations to these and all of our new graduates! 

Blog Excerpt: 

Every year, as part of the commencement celebration, we like to take a moment to highlight some of our GCC students who have gone above and beyond. Join us in congratulating these exceptional students.

Publish Date: 
Monday, April 23, 2018 - 12:15p.m.
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Stress Coping

Stress Coping Towards the End of the Semester

As we approach the end of the semester our plates tend to get a little full and our stress levels seem to rise faster than the temps outside. Unfortunately, life does not slow down and let us sniff the April flowers so we are often battling stressors on many fronts. Choices we make to combat these stressors can be the difference in a healthy and fresh start to the summer. In the interest of reducing your stress, here are a few quick stress coping strategies.

Four Stress Coping Strategies

1Pace Yourself - Don’t let the stress take over! Trust that your work will get done and don’t be afraid to stop for a few minutes and step away. Try a change in scenery or a different task to break up a feeling of being overwhelmed. Even while at work, shifting focus to a different project can give your brain some time to relax and refresh.

2. Move Yourself - Get up and move. The benefits of stress reduction with exercise are well documented. You don’t need to frequent the gym to gain the benefits of movement. All you need is a 15-20 minute walk, bike ride or swim to reduce stress for hours.

Check out the GCC walking routes http://www.gccaz.edu/content/fitness-wellness-heart-walk

Or,

The Walking Workstation https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf_U2Q50GWnFajnkhD9WWynjRBAfRKYMirPf_dEpFxfE298MA/viewform?c=0&w=1

You can also get fit at your desk with the GCC Deskercise video https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZ7C9OxcBjR4HIjPJRMIlSHMU2ihi2i_d

3. Support Yourself (and Support Another) - Before you walk, grab a friend. Having a strong social support system at home or at work can ease fears and allow for sharing your troubles. Utilize the stress reducing benefits of being able to share your thoughts with others.

4. Relax Yourself - Relaxation and meditation do not have to be done in a dark room alone. You can activate your mind, body and spirit with many activities such as yoga or tai chi. Being mindful can help you not only relax but also improve focus for your tasks. To be mindful is to have an awareness of your surroundings. This introspective look may help you see new perspectives or find the root cause of your stress. Meditation can also help you relieve stress and reset your frame of mind by completing a body scan. Here is one of my favorite 10 minute relaxation techniques:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ohz771A_aSk

Relax, Reset and Refresh!

Content Compliments of Aaron Fried, MS, ATC

Aaron is a faculty member in the Fitness and Wellness department. He is a Certified Athletic Trainer who was honored as the 2016 Arizona Athletic Trainer of the Year. Aaron served as an athletic trainer at GCC for 8 years and is now employed by the NFL as part of their concussion prevention protocol.  

 

Blog Excerpt: 

Stress Coping Towards the End of the Semester

As we approach the end of the semester our plates tend to get a little full and our stress levels seem to rise faster than the temps outside. Unfortunately, life does not slow down and let us sniff the April flowers so we are often battling stressors on many fronts. Choices we make to combat these stressors can be the difference in a healthy and fresh start to the summer. In the interest of reducing your stress, here are a few quick stress coping strategies.

Four Stress Coping Strategies

 

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, April 18, 2018 - 1:15p.m.
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March is National Nutrition Month

 

March is National Nutrition Month!

Go Further With Food

eatright_image.png

March is National Nutrition Month®! This is a yearly nutrition-based education campaign organized by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND).  This year's campaign focuses on encouraging everyone to “Go Further With Food.” In the United States, we waste about 31 percent of all edible food. American households throw away almost 28 percent of fruits and vegetables. 

The goals of this program are to inspire us to make better food choices and save money while we reduce food waste—a WIN WIN situation!

Some Suggestions!

Before you head to the grocery store:

  • Check what fruits and vegetables you have at home
  • Consider planning healthy meals and snacks for the week

When you head to the store:

When returning from the grocery store:

  • Consider freezing extra fruits, vegetables or meats to extend their shelf life
  • Date all frozen items
  • Use the oldest food first
  • Use leftover fruits and vegetables in smoothies or toss them in your water bottle with your favorite sparkling water

“Sell By” and “Best Used By”

These terms can get confusing!

The “Sell By” Date:

Is utilized more by the grocery store. It lets them know when to stop selling a product. It is more to manage their inventory.

The “Best if Used By” Date:

Is more for you, the consumer. It is the last date recommended to use a product at its peak quality. 

It is important to try to use all of the food you've bought, but if there are any doubts, throw it away. It is not worth the risk!

Other fun ideas to try during National Nutrition Month!

  • As a family, try a new fruit or vegetable each week
  • As a family, plan to eat more meals together—even if it is one more meal a week—go for it!
  • Organize a healthy potluck and have each food group represented
  • Focus on portion sizes: When eating a packaged meal or treat, does your portion of the meal or snack match the portion size on the packaging? Or, are you eating TWO or more portions of the meal or treat?

Re-growing your vegetables

This is such a COOL Youtube Video!  It is a short 2-minute video on how to regrow your old vegetables instead of throwing them out.  ENJOY!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eM3hU7NS_HI

Registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) are here to help you reduce food loss and waste.  We are here to provide easy-to-follow nutrition advice.  Learn more at eatright.org and follow #National Nutrition Month.

Content compliments of Anita Ramani. Anita is a registered dietitian with over 25 years of experience in inpatient and outpatient nutritional care. For the last 10 years, she has been happily working as an online instructor at GCC. She teaches multiple online courses including Food and Culture, Introduction to Food Allergies and Plant Based Nutrition. A fun fact about Anita: While living in Prague for three years, she started a catering business serving healthy Indian food. 

Sources:

http://www.eatrightpro.org/resource/media/press-releases/national-nutrition-month/for-national-nutrition-month-store-food-correctly-to-reduce-waste

http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/resources/national-nutrition-month/event-ideas

http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/resources/national-nutrition-month/toolkit

http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/celebrate_national_nutrition_month_in_your_community

 

 

Blog Excerpt: 

March is National Nutrition Month!

Go Further With Food

 

March is National Nutrition Month®! This is a yearly nutrition-based education campaign organized by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND).  

 

This year's campaign focuses on encouraging everyone to “Go Further With Food.”

In the United States, we waste about 31 percent of all edible food. American households throw away almost 28 percent of fruits and vegetables. 

 

The goals of this program are to inspire us to make better food choices and save money while we reduce food waste—a WIN WIN situation!

Publish Date: 
Friday, February 16, 2018 - 8:15p.m.
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Validation

I’ve been in academia a long time. Earning my master’s and doctorate, I had good professors and bad professors. I had great support staff and bad support staff. And every single time, one thing made the difference: feeling like I belonged. Feeling validated. Feeling like my professors and the college staff actually wanted me there.

It’s not new, this idea that validation breeds success. Many student success researchers have known it for decades. The problem is when we get too busy, too bogged down in the ritual of work, we – as college representatives – fail to look up from our papers and engage in the world surrounding us. The student’s world.

It's a simple realization that we all have a huge role to play in the success of our students and we cannot ignore the impact. 

So, at GCC, we are changing the conversation about students and our need to develop relationships with them. Students have lives too –and at a community college – often those lives are not easy ones. They are marked with challenges, obstacles and pain.

Students struggle with academic rigor, of course, but they also struggle with hunger, finances and family responsibilities. GCC offers multiple support structures – from counseling to a food pantry, emergency financial support and transportation.

There are so many things we, as a college community cannot fix for our students, but the simple act of investing in them when they are on our campus may be the one thing that changes a life forever.   

Most recently, during a conversation with faculty member in our math department, the professor said he had been inspired to schedule one-on-one meetings with each of his students to get to know them better. What a wonderful thing to do! Imagine if everyone did this – what a difference it would make!

But this isn’t just a GCC-led change. We are part of a bigger system – the Maricopa Community College system – that is taking a closer look at how we communicate with, respond to, and support our students. The project, called the “Transformation Plan” will result in “Guided Pathways” for students, a road map that will clearly identify what classes students need to take to reach their goal.

Right now, GCC's completion/transfer rate is 26 percent, which puts us at the 19th percentile for community colleges across the country. The national average is 37 percent. When I share with sad rate with our students, they are shocked.

GCC has set an aspirational goal to hit 75 percent. That’s lofty, I know.

So, we continue to look at academic advising and changing how we serve students. We are piloting a dedicated Business Advisor located in the Business Building, much like we already have for our Teacher Education program, STEM students, honors students and veterans.

Our student orientation, Gaucho 101, will now include a First Year Advisor for undecided students. They will partner with the Counseling Department to help the student land on an education path.

GCC, like so many colleges across the country struggle with staffing, state support, student retention and changing academic requirements. But, I for one, take heart in the small everyday impact we can make. One step at a time. 


I’m inviting you to join me each month on my blog for this journey as GCC fights for each student while they find and achieve their definition of success. I am passionate about students completing their education, and look forward to sharing our goals, our challenges and our progress with you.

Blog Excerpt: 

I’ve been in academia a long time. Earning my master’s and doctorate, I had good professors and bad professors. I had great support staff and bad support staff. And every single time, one thing made the difference: feeling like I belonged. Feeling validated. Feeling like my professors and the college staff actually wanted me there. 

Publish Date: 
Thursday, February 8, 2018 - 11:45a.m.
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New Year Resolution: Portion Sizes

New Year Resolutions:

Taking a Look at Your Portion Sizes!

When making a change, it is best to pick one resolution or change at a time. If you forget to follow your "new tradition"--then start again. Don’t give up! If the change is too difficult to follow, you may need to start with a simpler resolution. The more you follow through on your resolution, the more it becomes an easy habit to maintain!


Let’s take a look at our portion sizes!

When eating a packaged meal or treat, does your portion of the meal or snack match the portion size on the packaging? Or, are you eating TWO or more portions of the meal or treat?

For Example:

  • Is your whole wheat bread actually one serving or two?
  • Is your bag of chips actually one serving or two?
  • Is your serving of rice or pasta a 1/2 cup
  • Is your serving of milk actually 1 cup
  • Is your serving of cookies actually one serving or two?

If your portion size is larger than the serving size, simply scale back. Take a moment to savor what you are eating!

Remember: The calories, fat, protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals content match the portion size on the label.

This is a great guide: Web MD Portion Size Guide -- Print this and keep it in your wallet or where you eat most of your meals or snacks—then you can get a better idea of how much you are REALLY eating. 
 

Let’s take a look at our Plate Size!

plate_size.png

In the 1950s, our plates were 9 inches across in diameter. Today, the typical plate size is 12 inches in diameter!

When putting food on your plate, consider using a smaller plate or bowl when eating your lunch or dinner--visually you feel you are eating more than what you actually are.

If you are still hungry---eat more fruits and veggies! They are great fiber packing foods! 

myplate_blue.jpg

ChooseMyPlate.gov shows Americans how to balance their plate with a variety of healthful foods. This website has wonderful tips and tools to help you jumpstart your healthy eating habits! As you can see in the icon above, half of the plate is full of fruits and vegetables.

In a pinch, take a package of organic frozen green beans, add lemon pepper and salt and microwave for a couple of minutes. If you do not have lemon pepper, squeeze fresh lemon on the beans after they are cooked and add pepper.

You can use this recipe with so many vegetables. It is quick and easy, and a great way to add more veggies to your day, as well as feel full longer!

Nazario, Brunilda. “Portion Size Plate | Recommended Serving Sizes for Portion Control.” WebMD, WebMD, 8 Jan. 2013, www.webmd.com/diet/healthtool-portion-size-plate.

https://www.choosemyplate.gov/

Thomas, Wendy. “Size really does matter.” Parenting NH, Http://Simplethrift.wordpress.com, May 2013, www.parentingnh.com/May-2013/Size-really-does-matter/.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nutrition_facts_label

Blog Excerpt: 

Taking a Look at Your Portion Sizes!

When making a change, it is best to pick one resolution or change at a time. If you forget to follow your "new tradition"--then start again. Don’t give up! If the change is too difficult to follow, you may need to start with a simpler resolution. The more you follow through on your resolution, the more it becomes an easy habit to maintain!

Publish Date: 
Thursday, January 11, 2018 - 5:00p.m.
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New Traditions for the New Year

New Traditions for the New Year

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When reaching for a sweet treat, think about a piece of fruit! According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, we need to consume approximately 2 cups of fruit a day. 

The Majority of fruits are:

  • Packed with vitamins, minerals and antioxidants
  • Low in fat
  • Low in sodium 
  • Low in calories
  • No cholesterol
  • High in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants such as Vitamin C, Potassium and Folate

Fruits Help:

  • Reduce blood pressure
  • Reduce cholesterol
  • Reduce the risk of certain cancers
  • Reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke
  • Increase wound healing 
  • Provide folic acid, which is known to help prevent brain and spinal cord defects during pregnancy
  • Keep your skin looking young! Antioxidants and Vitamin A, C and E are great for this!
     

Remember to:

  • Eat the Rainbow--Eat a variety to get the best benefits!
     

A serving of fruit is only 60 calories--these are all great examples!

  • 1/2 cup no added sugar applesauce
  • 10-15 grapes
  • 2 small tangerines
  • 1/2 cup of canned fruit in juice
  • 3/4 cup of blueberries
  • 1 1/4 cup of strawberries
  • 1 cup of raspberries

Enjoy these quick and delicious snacks today! 

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Contents compliments of Anita Ramani MEd, RDN, GCC Food and Nutrition Adjunct Faculty

Blog Excerpt: 

When reaching for a sweet treat, think about a piece of fruit! According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, we need to consume approximately 2 cups of fruit a day. 

The Majority of fruits are:

  • Packed with vitamins, minerals and antioxidants
  • Low in fat
  • Low in sodium 
  • Low in calories
  • No cholesterol
  • High in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants such as Vitamin C, Potassium and Folate
Publish Date: 
Tuesday, December 12, 2017 - 9:30a.m.
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What’s Wrong with Being Confident?

I’ve served as your interim president at Glendale Community College for the past year and a half. This is not an easy job, but I wouldn’t trade it for any other career. None.

I have grown as a person and as a leader as a result. I have been privileged to strengthen my leadership philosophy and engage in conversations with amazing and committed educators and leaders as we seek to make the right decisions that will have an impact on our students and the community we serve.

My decisions are always through the lens of impact to students: Are we consistent in how we serve students? Are we following all policies and regulations? Are we keeping our students safe? Of course, those three questions apply to our students, but they also apply to the dedicated faculty and staff who support our students and community.

There’s another layer. Our commitment to the taxpayers: Are we being fiscally responsible with our decisions? As the president, I am responsible for an annual budget of $83 million. This is no small number; and being able to make decisions that allow GCC to serve students, while keeping the campus up-to-date and secure, is a high priority. I say it again: This is not an easy job.

But I’m confident. I’m confident of the work we are doing, and the decisions we are making. I’m confident our students are receiving an excellent education from faculty who care deeply about their success. I’m confident our administration is working hard to ensure we are meeting state and federal guidelines. I’m confident we are moving the campus forward into the next century of education.

Confidence sometimes comes with a price, though. Whether you’re a leader of a college, or the leader of a classroom project – there are detractors. Someone will always want to derail your vision, slow your progress or stymie your success. If I stopped moving forward every time someone disagreed with me, whispered about me or put up an obstacle, I would never have had the opportunity to serve this college.

I measure myself constantly against the bar of career and motherhood. We all have multiple pressures and bars that we weigh our successes and failures against. My challenge to you is this: Don’t stop. Surround yourself with people who disagree respectfully and push you to the next level. Look at the nay-sayers’ comments with an open mind, and dig deep inside your philosophy to see if there’s perhaps something they may offer. No one ever moved upward and onward without controversy and conflict. Embrace it and learn from it.

And as you, dear student, continue your journey, my hope is that you reach out to others...as your confidence grows, use it to help lift someone else. The world needs more of your confidence. More of you. 


I’m inviting you to join me each month on my blog for this journey as GCC fights for each student while they find and achieve their definition of success. I am passionate about students completing their education, and look forward to sharing our goals, our challenges and our progress with you.

Blog Excerpt: 

Whether you’re a leader of a college, or the leader of a classroom project – there are detractors. Someone will always want to derail your vision, slow your progress or stymie your success. If I stopped moving forward every time someone disagreed with me, whispered about me or put up an obstacle, I would never have had the opportunity to serve this college.

Publish Date: 
Friday, December 8, 2017 - 10:30a.m.
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Holiday Heartburn?

Holiday Heartburn?

holiday_food_pic.jpg

Holidays are a time where we look forward to spending time with family, eating great food and watching some serious football!

However, during this wonderful time—many of us can experience heartburn. Heartburn (or acid indigestion) is an irritation of the esophagus that results when acid comes up (refluxes) from the stomach.

The American Gastroenterological Association states that are more than 60 million Americans have heartburn and/or reflux symptoms at least once a month.

Normally:

We swallow food

Food travels through the throat 

Food travels through the throat

As food travels through the esophagus, the Lower Esophageal Sphincter (LES) opens to allow food into the stomach.

(The LES is a bundle of muscles where the esophagus meets the stomach)      

The Lower Esophageal Sphincter closes.

The stomach releases acids to continue to break down food

However, IF the LES opens too often or does not close tight enough, the stomach acids can reflux into the esophagus. Then, we feel the symptoms of heartburn.

Do you ever notice that you experience heartburn when you consume these foods or beverages?

  • Spicy Foods
  • Chocolate
  • Alcohol or Caffeine
  • Raw onion or garlic
  • Citrus products and juices such as orange or grapefruit juice
  • Tomatoes or tomato products such as pizza or spaghetti sauce
  • Fatty or greasy foods such as fried foods, fast foods or ice cream
  • Mints such as peppermints

How can you avoid Holiday Heartburn?

If these changes decrease your heartburn, you may want to consider making these lifestyle changes

  • Avoid foods or beverages that bother you
  • Eat smaller meals throughout the day
  • Eat slowly-take your time!
  • Save the leftovers-save it for the next day or freeze it
  • Try not to lie down after eating or drinking
  • Exercise to reduce stress
  • Lose weight if you are overweight
  • Decrease or give up smoking

If you have frequent heartburn, it could be Gastro esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). It’s a good idea to have your doctor check you out. Frequent heartburn can lead to other conditions such as:

  • Inflammation of the esophagus
  • Ulcers
  • Painful swallowing
  • Narrowing or cancer of the esophagus

This is such a great video - It reiterates the points so beautifully!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QMduiIHq9Ks

Enjoy your Holidays! Take your time making these small changes that will benefit you in the long run!

Contents compliments of Anita Ramani MEd, RDN, GCC Food and Nutrition Adjunct Faculty

 

Johnson, A. (2015, June). What You Need to Know About GERD. Retrieved November 18, 2017, from http://www.eatright.org/resource/health/wellness/digestive-health/what-you-need-to-know-about-gerd

Http://nutritionletter.tufts.edu/issues/9_2/current-articles/Eat-Right-to-fight-Heartburn-and-Reflux_958-1.html. (n.d.). Retrieved February 19, 2013, from http://nutritionletter.tufts.edu/issues/9_2/current-articles/Eat-Right-to-fight-Heartburn-and-Reflux_958-1.html

https://uvahealth.com/services/digestive-health/images-and-docs/gerd.pdf/

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). (n.d.). Retrieved November 19, 2017, from https://www.webmd.com/heartburn-gerd/guide/reflux-disease-gerd-1#1

 

 

Blog Excerpt: 

Holiday Heartburn?

Holidays are a time where we look forward to spending time with family, eating great food and watching some serious football!

However, during this wonderful time—many of us can experience heartburn. Heartburn (or acid indigestion) is an irritation of the esophagus that results when acid comes up (refluxes) from the stomach.

The American Gastroenterological Association states that are more than 60 million Americans have heartburn and/or reflux symptoms at least once a month.

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 12:00p.m.
Site Section: 
Social Icons: 

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